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Guidelines and Policies

NSW Service Plan for Specialist Mental Health Services for Older People
Guideline, 2005-2015

Palliative Care Service Provision in Australia: A planning guide [PDF]    NSW
Palliative Care Australia
Provides guidance on palliative care service delivery with the aim of improving patient and carer outcomes.

Toolkits and Protocols

Gender Sensitive Health Service Provision
Women’s Centre for Health Matters

Legislation


National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013
Cth
Creates the framework for a national scheme, including eligibility criteria, age requirements, and what constitutes reasonable and necessary support. It also established the National Disability Insurance Scheme Launch Transition Agency (the NDIS Launch Agency). Launch locations have been chosen in the ACT, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia.

DisabilityCare Australia – (Formerly National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Cth
Provides funding for disability services on the basis of support for life-long care and assisted decision-making. The Scheme will help participants to develop a goal-based plans based on their goals and the support the NDIS intends to provide.

Cases

Richards v Rahilly [2005] NSWSC 352 NSW
The fact that a practitioner is working in a rural context may have an effect on the standard of care.

Kalokerinos v Burnett [1996] NSWSC 324 NSW
The Court of Appeal found that had the cancer been diagnosed earlier it could have been treated by a hysterectomy. Early detection would have avoided radical radiation treatment which led to serious side-effects. It was also agreed that the patient had contributed to the negligence. She knew that vaginal bleeding was a sign of cancer and she also knew that there were doctors at Inverell, a town which was not far away from where she lived.

Tai v Hatzistavrou [1999] NSWCA 306 NSW; Kite v Malycha (1998) 71 SASR 321.
Practitioners must have a system for following up patients who have failed to attend appointments. This can be complicated in rural settings where communication with patients may be more difficult.

Young v Central Aboriginal Congress Inc [2008] NTSC 47 NT
The defendant medical clinic was found to be negligent in failing to follow-up a patient and make sure he attended for further medical tests in relation to suspected heart disease.

Papers, Reports and Books

Medical Service Provision in Rural and Remote Australia
Background Paper Prepared by Col White for Board (2002)
Queensland Rural Medical Support Agency.

Rural, regional and remote health: a guide to remoteness classifications.
Canberra, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2004)

Rural, regional and remote health: a study on mortality.
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2007) Canberra, AIHW.

Rural, regional and remote medicine as a medical specialty
Australian Medical Education Council (2005)

Bioethics and rural health: theorizing place, space, and subjects
Kelly, SE (2003) 56 (11) Social Science Medicine 2277-88.

Birthing in the bush: it’s time to listen
Kildea, S. Centre for Family Health and Midwifery. University of Sydney.
(2005)

Differences in management of heart attack patients between metropolitan and regional hospitals in the Hunter Region of Australia
Lim, LL, RL O’Connell, et al (1999) 23(1) Aust NZ J Public Health 61-6.

A proposed rural healthcare ethics agenda
Nelson, W, A Pomerantz, et al (2007) 33(3) J Med Ethics 136-9.

Surgical service centralisation in Australia versus choice and quality of life for rural patients
Stewart, Gd, G Long, et al (2006) 185(3) Medical Journal of Australia 162-3.

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